Having Fun with Poetry

“Poetry shmoetry.”  “I hate poetry.”  “Poetry is for girls.”  “Flowers, sunshine, and birds.  Yuck.”  “Poetry is so boring.”  I could go on, but you get the idea.  Most students with whom I’ve worked over the years feel this way about poetry.  They just don’t like it, for whatever reason.  Perhaps their previous teachers did not effectively introduce poetry to them in an engaging and meaningful way.  Or, maybe, they just weren’t ready to learn about poetry prior to entering the sixth grade.  With this much disdain towards the art of poetry, I make it a yearly mission to change the way my students think about poetry.  I work to help them see poetry as something that is fun and challenging to do.  I want my students leaving the sixth grade with a broader perspective on poetry.

Today in my Humanities class, I introduced the concept of a Poetry Slam to the boys…

A poetry slam is

like a play with a

cast of one.

Words create the scenery

as your body weaves

emotion throughout

the audience.

 

Have fun as you

recite your chosen

haiku for all to hear.

Act, perform, and paint

pictures with your

words and body,

Leaving the audience

stunned and wanting…

 

I tried to convey a sense of excitement and fun through my description of this amazing event, with which we were about to embark.  I didn’t model a sample, as I really wanted the students to draw their own conclusions and interpret the parameters creatively.

First student read his haiku

as if he were dead and lifeless.

I was bored, as were the others.

Do I stop and correct him?

I wondered as he finished.

Holding the bar high for

my students, I knew what

had to be done.  I didn’t snap

my fingers like the others,

when words stopped flowing

from his lips.  Instead I called

him out saying, “You can do better

than this.”  Then I performed

a haiku in the Poetry Slam way

to show him what fun could be had.

He went again, and nailed it

like it was the final piece in

a ship of words he built

for us all to ride upon.

Amazing, I thought. “Now,

that’s how you perform

at a Poetry Slam,” I said

to him as he walked off stage

grinning in excitement.

 

The rest of the students blew me away, as they read their haikus aloud for us all to hear and enjoy.  It was a banquet of awesomeness for our ears and eyes.  The boys writhed around the stage, as they recited their poems, adding emphasis and emotion for impact.  They had so much fun performing in front of their peers.  Students who are usually so quiet, got into character and read their poems with gusto and panache.  I was thoroughly amazed.  The boys had a blast during our first Poetry Slam, as they realized how much fun poetry can be when you change the way you look at it.  It’s not just words on paper.  It’s emotion, blood, sweat, and tears pouring from one’s heart.  Poetry is all the stuff that makes life what it is: Alive and real.

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Transforming Haikus into FUN-kus

When I was a kid, I used to love playing with GO-Bots.  I mean, who wouldn’t love transforming a car or truck into a robot?  C’mon now.  They were so cool.  I thought for sure that they were going to be the biggest toy to hit the market since Legos.  Sadly, Transformers were released a year later, and put the kibosh on any success the GO-Bots might have seen.  While I did thoroughly enjoy Transformers, as they were much more complex in terms of their transformations, compared to the GO-Bots, I tend to be a sucker for things that come before.  My heart will always be with the fearless GO-Bots.

Like the GO-Bots did with a little human help, I did a little transforming of my own today in the sixth grade classroom.  You see, I have found over the years that students begin a lesson on Haiku poetry with a very fixed mindset.  They either love the Haiku form of poetry because it provides them with a clear format and equation for how to create one, or, they hate it because it’s too structured or confining.  Today was certainly no exception to that fact.  As we began discussing Haikus, I heard some groans and saw a few sad faces.  The boys were upset that they would have to craft boring and challenging Haiku poems today in class.  As the lesson progressed, however, the atmosphere in the classroom seemed to be transforming.

Here’s a little play-by-play of the major highlights from today’s lesson on Haiku poetry that helped my students to see Haikus in a new light.

  • As disengagement began to fill my classroom, I had the students examine three different examples of Haiku poetry as an active way for me to introduce the poetic form to the class.  I had student volunteers read each Haiku aloud before asking students to make observations and noticings.  What did you notice about these three Haikus?  What do they have in common?  The students noticed that Haikus have three lines, the second line is the longest, Haikus are focused on one topic or object that readers will be able to easily identify or relate to, and the meter is 5-7-5.  I was impressed that they were able to pick up on all of this just from simply studying some sample Haikus.  As they shared their noticings with the class, I added some footnotes in the form of questions: Does a Haiku have to contain exactly five syllables in the first line, seven in the second, and five in the third?  Does it have to rhyme?  Can it be funny?  These questions allowed the students to begin to realize that what they thought was a constrictive form of poetry, is actually a bit more open and flexible.
  • As the students started to wrap their minds around the syllable requirement of a Haiku, I asked them why teachers often incorporate Haiku into a unit on poetry if it tends to be greatly disliked by the students.  The first young man I called upon said, “Word choice.”  Being able to choose the right word means that you must increase your vocabulary as you learn new synonyms and vocabulary words.  Learning to be selective with the words one uses in one’s writing, helps one grow and develop as a writer.  At this point, despite liking the Haiku form of poetry or not, the students started to see the relevance in why they should learn about this form of poetry.
  • After fielding the few questions posed by my students about Haiku poetry, I called on three volunteers, at random, to generate a class Haiku based on a topic suggested by another member of my class.  The topic was family.  The first student shared his opening line, “Family is a warm group,” which happened to be seven syllables in length instead of the suggested five.  So, I called on another student to revise the line, transforming it into a line containing only five syllables.  He subtracted the powerless words “is” and “a.”  The second student shared his brilliant line, which contained exactly seven syllables.  The final student had his line ready to go before I even called upon him.  His line formed the perfect closing to a wonderful poem on family.  The students seemed to really understand this form of poetry once we crafted a class Haiku.
  • The students had 12 minutes to begin crafting their own Haiku poems in class.  As they wrote, I walked around, observing the students.  I read their lines and provided them positive feedback on what they had constructed.  I was amazed with what they were writing.  More than anything, though, I was impressed by how engaged and excited they were during this process.  Every student began typing right away.  They seemed invested in crafting wonderful works of art.

By empowering my students to determine the format of a Haiku based on examples we read together as a class, they felt in control.  I wasn’t telling them how to write a Haiku.  Instead, I was asking them how to write a Haiku.  This turning of the tables, so to speak, provided the students with the ownership they needed to feel invested in the task of crafting three Haikus.  By also broadening the requirements of a Haiku, the students felt as though they had more options in how they could write their own Haikus.  I was no longer limiting them by saying, “Your first line MUST include only five syllables.”  I transformed this controlling language into something more engaging, “While I’d like you to work towards including only five syllables in the first line, if you can’t, for whatever reason, don’t worry about it.  The syllable formula is a suggestion and not a rule.  Take a risk, try new things, and if you mess up, keep persevering, looking for just the right word.”  The boys really liked this new explanation of the syllable count suggestion, as it provided them with options and flexibility.  Unlike how Billy Corgan felt in his epic song Bullet with Butterfly Wings, my students did not feel like “just a rat in a cage” as they crafted their Haikus in class today.  They felt empowered to take risks, choose words they like, and craft Haikus that spoke to who they are as individuals and not some confining format.  Transforming how I taught the Haiku form of poetry to my students today helped them to see the fun in writing short poems, much like I saw the fun and simplicity in playing with GO-Bots.  Changing one’s perspective can really have a powerful impact.

Perspective

Opening one’s mind

generates new perspective,

and changes the world.

Preparing My Students to be Superhero Poets

When I’m in my classroom, on some days, I feel like a superhero as I fly around the room helping my students overcome problems.  Perhaps it’s the teaching cape I wear.  Maybe that’s what really does it for me.  Being a super teacher fells pretty great.  On other days though, I feel like a swashbuckling knight destroying the evil distraction dragons that try to defeat my students.  As swords are not permitted at my school, I don’t really have any props to bring this fantasy to life; however, my costume box does hold a shield and plastic sword.  Perhaps that’s what makes this feeling more of a reality.  Sometimes though, I feel like a merman on a quest to bring order and justice to the sea of chaos otherwise known as my classroom.  Ever since I first saw the movie Splash with Tom Hanks, I’ve been in search of a mermaid.  I’ve looked in the ocean on every whale watch, to no avail.  Teaching is certainly no easy feat, and one does need to harness special powers to be a really great teacher.  Feeling like a superhero, knight, or merman helps bring light to the challenge in front of me each and every day when I walk into my classroom.  I need to support and challenge my students while also keeping them safe and cared for.

Today, as I zoomed around my classroom, things felt different.  I felt different.  My lesson on poetry seemed to be really making strides, more so than ever before.  My students seemed to fully understand how poetry is different from prose and what makes a poem great.  They contributed wise insight to our discussions.  It was quite amazing, but slightly unexpected.  Then, when the boys began crafting their own, unique poems, things started to get really strange.  The boys were crafting masterpieces of words and figurative language.  They were taking risks and trying new word combinations.  I’ve never had an introductory poetry lesson go as well as today’s.  What was going on?  Was it the curse of Friday the 13th?  Was that the cause of this strangeness today in the sixth grade classroom?

Perhaps the date did have something to do with the result that transpired during my Humanities class this morning.  Or maybe it was all of the work I put into creating a unit on figurative language that built up to poetry in a very deliberate and purposeful way.  I do believe that was what led to the awesomeness that occurred in my classroom this morning.  You see, rather than completing a short and brief introductory lesson on poetry this year, I wanted to have my students explore language, its history, and power before having my students play with words and craft poems of their own.  We began our unit by discussing the power of words.  The students learned that every word packs a punch, some more than others.  They also learned what gives words their power as we dug into etymology.  These opening lessons carried us into Wednesday’s activity, in which the students literally played with words to create new and interesting combinations.  The students took risks and worked to create unique images and phrases.  Then today, I introduced the idea and concept of poetry to my students.  After a short discussion on what makes a poem poetic, the students began trying their hand at crafting a poem of their own.  I didn’t belabor my explanation of the poetry activity, as I wanted to empower my students to apply the skill of self-awareness and problem solving we’ve been working on all year.  The boys got right to work on their verses.  I was blown away at what they produced in such a short time, with very little explanation.

Examples of their Greatness

The trees are pillars to the heavens

Streams as pure as the hope that guides us.

Fall leaves, works of art

Caves chances to explore

Branches full of needles as if ready to sew

sticks opportunity for imaginative fun

Warm rocks, places to sit and enjoy it all

Spring leaves cast mystic green light as it to make it all alive, even the shadows

And after it all you end up on the edge of a pool of the woods living in it all,

feeling the life that fills it and makes it beyond perfect


The ball cuts through the grass,

like a swimmer diving into a pool,

it reaches its destination,

the goal,

it dives into the net lobbying,

like a golf ball hit into the sky,

it sails like odysseus into the goal.

 

As the students had been exploring language and the power that words hold for the past few weeks in Humanities class, my students had already been wearing their poetic mindset without even realizing it.  Along with our class read-aloud novel Booked by Kwame Alexander that is written in verse and provided the students with much fodder and inspiration since we began it at the start of our unit, the structure of the lessons leading up to today’s poetry activity laid the foundation for my students to think like a poet.  They were becoming word doctors without even noticing, which I believe led to the fantastic result that I was lucky enough to witness in class today.

To be a superhero teacher, I need to be prepared for every situation or dilemma thrown my way.  Planning this figurative language unit in the way I did, allowed my students to feel totally comfortable with the art of poetry.  In years past, my students struggled with poetry because they didn’t fully understand how to play with words and use them in new or fun ways.  I was forcing them to do something that they were not properly prepared for.  Today, my students were more than ready to write their own poems because they now understand how language works.  They get it, and it showed today.  Sadly, there were no distraction dragons for me to slay in the classroom today because my students were all so committed to crafting amazing and brilliant poems.  They were engaged and happy in Humanities class.  They were excited to write poetry and put words together in unique and fun ways.  It was awesome.  I felt more like a puppy in the sidecar of my students’ motorcycle today, observing from the side and being completely happy and content just sniffing at the air, than I did a superhero, knight, or merman.  And you know what, that’s exactly how I should feel.  I’ve worked hard this year to prepare my students for moments like this.  They don’t need my super powers anymore as they have gained their own.  They are ready to slay their own dragons and conquer the world without fear, knowing that I’m always there watching them, proudly.

My Day in Verse

I asked my students today to explain the etymology of a particular word in verse form.  Many of my students were challenged by this task, at first, until they started exploring words and verse and recalled our read-aloud text written in this same form.  They then realized how much fun crafting a poem can truly be.  For when writing poetry, one gets to subtract words by adding meaning.  So, to be a good role model, I’ll be writing today’s reflection in verse form.

The Randomness of the Stock Market

Answering questions and making observations,

I meandered about the classroom

like a Cougar stalking its prey.

I watched, waited, and then pounced

as a question appeared,

almost out of thin air.

“Why are we learning

about the Stock Market?

It’s so random.  How

do we know in what

company to invest?  It

makes no sense,”

he asked, confused and concerned.

I paused, reflecting on

this thoughtful pondering.

“Well, you see,” I said,

“When you get to the heart

of the Stock Market

there is much predictability

and science at work.

In fact, randomness doesn’t

exist in the Market. For,

if you pay attention and do your

research, you can control

what you once thought was chaotic.”

While this answer didn’t seem

to change his mind or alter

his perception right away,

I’m hopeful that he will process

this new data throughout

our unit and see the patterns

that exist in the Stock Market,

instead of the randomness that

his mind currently comprehends.

 

The Evolution of Language

When there was nothing,

language did not exist.

Stardust filled our world

as living organisms

began to evolve and thrive.

Then, came humans,

and next came language.

Long before spoken words,

language was in its infancy,

growing out of body movements

and emotions.  Slowly, over time

this silent language transformed

into something greater,

something more powerful: Words.

And thus, spoken language

was born.  First there was one,

that led to numerous other

languages, until there were

numerous, different spoken words

strewn about like candy on Halloween.

One language gave birth to another

and so on.  Latin led into Italian,

French, and Spanish.

Then we had puzzle-piece languages

that were a crucible of multiple

language families,

the most famous being English.

My students seemed captivated by

the story of language development

of which I spoke in class today

as we began exploring etymology

and the story behind the words

we speak.

 

That One Student

Driving this morning, as angel tears

fell from the sky, the radio

played a song, but not

just any song

like any other morning.

No, you see, this song

was special.  This song

is the tie that will forever

bind me to my best friend

from college:

Everlong by the Foo Fighters

filled my car like magical

fairy dust from heaven.

I cranked the volume up

and started singing like

I was in college again.

This one song, helped

carry me through this

dreary day of clouds and rain,

just as that one student

seemed to transform, a bit,

from all about him to

mostly about others.

A few days ago, I reflected

on that one student

who seemed to be stagnating

in class, unable to grow

and develop into a thoughtful,

kind young man ready

for seventh grade.

He seemed stuck on himself

and all that revolved around him.

After having him not raise

his hand to participate

in class discussions for the

past two days,

he’s taken notes on the

positive and wonderful words

his peers have injected

into our conversation.

Instead of talking, he has

been listening and thinking

about being grateful

and thankful for his classmates.

Speaking with him about

this today, I told him

what I hope this little experiment

will foster within him

in the coming weeks.

“I hope you begin to

see that it doesn’t matter

if you raise your hand

but don’t get called upon

during class, because your

peers have insightful thoughts

and ideas that can grow

our discussion in unique ways

like your words could

if time permitted.”

He agreed with me

and seemed to understand

the power of what I had said.

He didn’t debate or argue

the words that jumped

over my lips and through

my teeth.  He accepted them,

showing change and growth.

This little activity could

possibly be the flint he needs

to ignite his fire of readiness.

That one student, and

this one song allowed

me to see that words do indeed

have much power

and invoke much emotion:

“I wonder if everything could

feel this real forever.”

Transforming Grampa Grammar Into Cool Uncle Cal

Grammar is like the prim and proper grandfather of the language family.  He wears a fancy sweater vest, which is made entirely of wool from sheep only found in Ireland, underneath his brown plaid blazer.  He has a copious vocabulary of large words, but doesn’t flaunt them often.  He’s quiet, but speaks when necessary.  The other members of the family are scared to ask speak with him as they are worried about the difficult questions he may pose.  What’s the difference between affect and effect?  Should you use lie or lay in the sentence?  He sits in the back of the room, usually in the middle of the couch.  Despite his quiet demeanor, he is the glue that holds the family together.  When trouble strikes, Grampa Grammar is there to save the day.  He adds conjunctions to run-on sentences to prevent them from running amok.  He throws periods and commas into oceans of text, saving many lives from drowning in chaos and confusion.  He is the quiet leader of the language family, despite his need for specificity and accuracy.

Grammar has always struck me as that grandfather-like figure who corrects you when you mistakenly use myself or them in speaking with him.  While no one really likes Grampa Grammar, we need him to know how to properly speak and write in any language.  In high school, I used to despise grammar lessons, as they felt so forced and difficult.  Why do I really need to underline every adjective clause in the 20 sentences on this worksheet?  Is this knowledge every really going to save my life or come in handy in the future?  Pssst, I hate to be that guy, but I’ve never needed to know grammar specifics since graduating from college.  If I’m ever curious about word usage or parts of speech, I look them up online or in the grammar guide I used in college.  Now, just because I don’t find myself needing to identify what type of preposition is in this sentence, doesn’t mean that it’s not important and good to learn all about grammar and what makes language tick.  Grammar can be very fun and interesting.  Diagramming sentences can be a really great way to spend a Saturday night with some friends.  If you incorrectly identify the part of speech of any word, you must drink an entire can of Mt. Dew soda while reciting the alphabet backwards.  What could possibly be more fun than that?  In all seriousness though, grammar should be an essential part of every Humanities or language class; however, how it is taught makes the difference between allowing students to see grammar as the stuffy grampa in the back of the room or the cool uncle that lets you drive his new Camaro.

Over the years, how I have taught grammar in my Humanities class has evolved.  I used to teach it in a way that made my students dislike it as much as I did.  Then, after doing research on grammar instruction over the years, I’ve come to realize that in order for students to really appreciate and see the joy and importance in grammar, I need to teach the topic in a relevant and engaging manner.  Worksheets make grammar seem uncool.  So, I’ve moved towards mini-lessons and novelty instruction.  I’ve tried to find new and intriguing ways to help my students understand why our language works the way in which it does.

Yesterday, I helped my students understand the evils of run-on sentences and how to prevent them from happening in their writing.  I began the mini-lesson with a quick discussion on run-on sentences.  I asked the students to define the term. I explained to the students that run-on sentences are like wild animals running loose in the classroom.  If we’re not careful, they will take over the world.  We need to keep them contained and leashed at all times.  The boys found this image quite humorous, which allowed it to better stick in their minds for future reference.  I’m sure that very few of my students will forget run-on sentences and how to prevent them from happening in their writing any time soon.  I then had the boys, independently, correct two run-on sentences on paper so that they had a chance to individually demonstrate their ability and prior knowledge on the topic.  This short activity then led into a whole class discussion on run-on sentences and how to fix them.  I explained the different types of run-on sentences that they will often see in their writing or the writing of their peers.  I had volunteers correct the sentences they had practiced repairing on their own.  This then brought up many different points including conjunctions, commas, semicolons, and periods.  We laughed and had fun discussing grammar.  The boys seemed thoroughly engaged the entire time.  In about 15 minutes, I helped my students understand how to properly write grammatically correct sentences.  Awesome sauce!

Yesterday’s lesson helped me see the power of novelty and engagement.  I need to find creative and inventive ways to teach my students all about grammar.  Simply providing my students with information on the parts of speech will not help them genuinely learn and remember grammar and how to create grammatically correct sentences.  I need to make grammar sticky for them, mentally speaking, so that they will be able to remember and effectively recall this information at a later date and time.  Today during class, when we were discussing trivia questions and how noone in the class answered a question correctly, one of the students said, “It’s like the run-on sentences taking over the classroom.  Craziness and chaos ensue.”  Yes, I thought to myself.  They get it and remembered it.  Mission, accomplished.

As I reflected on what this student said to me, it made me realize that I need to make all of my grammar lessons memorable, just like that one.  So, my brain began percolating, and ideas started flowing like chocolate from a fountain…

I would start introducing grammar at the beginning of the year by having students interact and play with magnetic poetry words.  I’d have them create super long and interesting phrases and lines of words.  I would then provide them all with a plastic knife that would represent a scalpel and train them to be language doctors.  I wouldn’t even use the word grammar.  I would simply talk about the need for knowing how to fix their own writing and the writing of their classmates.  I would then build on these language doctor lessons throughout the first term using grammar concepts without ever uttering the often evil word “grammar.”

I love it.  My idea is based on how some teachers at a school with struggling math students created a new course for them that wasn’t called a math class and the word math was never mentioned until the very end of the academic year.  The students solved problems and learned complex math concepts without even realizing that they were learning math.  My approach to grammar instruction would do the same thing.  I can’t wait to try it next year.  In the meantime, I’m going to keep trying to make grammar fun and exciting for my students this year.  I might even pilot some of my language doctor ideas later in the year to see how they work out.  When grammar becomes boring like the old grampa in the room, students become disengaged.  As grammar is the glue that holds language together, we need to help our students see grammar concepts as vital and important.  We need to empower our students to become language fixers instead of language disaster makers.

Awesome Sauce: When Learning Happens in the Classroom

Being a teacher has its many perks and rewards:

  • Observing students really “get” stuff and have A-Ha moments in the classroom.
  • Being able to decorate your classroom anyway you want with no one telling you, “Those drapes clash with that carpet.”
  • Helping students grow and develop.
  • Challenging students to change their perspective on life.
  • Halloween.  Need I say more?
  • Celebrating a furry brown creature who lives in the ground with songs, poems, and fun.
  • Meeting new students on the first day of school.
  • Running into past students in strange places and taking a stroll down memory lane.

I bet that some of you thought snow days and summer vacation were going to be at the top of my list.  While we, as teachers, do love our time off, we’d much rather be in the classroom with our students molding minds and helping create the next generation of leaders, thinkers, and doers.

Another thing teachers really love about their lifestyle choice is seeing that their students are actually learning.  Yes, it’s great to see the moment when they understand something like a lightbulb going off in their brain, but seeing students apply that new knowledge they learn is even cooler.

Over the years, I’ve wrestled with how to help students see the power of the peer editing process.  How do I help students understand the value in providing their peers with meaningful feedback that will help them effectively revise their written work?  How can I best teach students to be effective peer editors?  Each year I feel as though teaching students to be great peer editors is like what early American settlers went through when they journeyed west in search of land, an arduous and long journey.  It takes many students the entire year to really be able to master the skill of providing their peers with useful feedback.  I get it.  Having a careful eye and providing constructive feedback to others is not an easy thing to do.  It’s hard to effectively help others to make their writing better.  I sometimes struggle with this skill myself, and I’m an adult.  I understand that this journey to becoming an effective peer editor can be bumpy and filled with unexpected twists and turns, which is why I don’t expect my students to be able to meaningfully help others revise their written work until later in the academic year.

Now, while I’ve heard that miracles do happen, I have yet to see any in my short life.  Wait a minute, I take that back: My teenaged son once woke up in a pleasant mood.  That was definitely a miracle.  Inside my classroom, I was fortunate enough today to see another miracle: My students effectively peer editing each other’s written work.

Today’s class began much like any other.  The boys wrote down the homework and completed a Brain Puzzle activity altogether as a class.  Nothing special or miraculous happened.  The boys did what was expected of them.  Then, I introduced the peer editing activity that the students would be completing in class.  I reviewed the difference between editing and revising and made a list on the board of the various writing features they should be looking to comment on regarding their partner’s Learning Goals Plan.  I went over the steps of the process and made sure they understood what was expected of them.  As I was definitely employing a fixed mindset going into today’s class, I was certain that they would have time to peer edit with at least three different students since they usually only provide their partner with superficial feedback on how they can improve their work.  Then came the miracle.

The students got right to work.  No, that wasn’t the miracle.  While I have had previous classes struggle with this skill, this year’s group is great at getting right to work.  The miracle came when they started to work.  The students were asking each other questions like, “How will you use a growth mindset?  What do you mean here?  Could you explain more here?”  I was amazed.  They were really trying to provide their partner with constructive feedback.  They were focusing on the big features of their written work and not the little, nit picky stuff like spelling or grammar.  They were trying to help their partner become a better, more effective writer.  They posed great questions and provided each other with effective and meaningful feedback.  It was awesome.  They were completing the peer editing process in a real and genuine manner.  They weren’t just going through the motions like classes in the past have done, oh no.  They were taking the time to really dissect their partner’s work so that he could put it back together in a more effective way.  I was amazed.  They spent so long working with one partner, that they only had time to provide feedback to one student prior to the end of class.  Wow!

How were they able to accomplish this task so early in the year?  No other group has demonstrated mastery of this skill so soon in the school year.  What allowed or helped my students to be successful during today’s activity?   Was it because we’ve been focusing on helping our students utilize a growth mindset while working?   Was that it?  Or was it that I explained what they needed to do in a way that made sense to them?  Perhaps it was because I reminded them that I will be grading them on their ability to provide their partner with effective feedback.  Maybe the sunny weather motivated them to buckle down and really work in class today.  Who knows what it was, as there were so many variables at play.  I don’t feel as though I taught the skill of peer editing any differently this year than I did in past years, and so I’m not sure what it was that helped them all showcase their ability to peer edit their partner’s work in a meaningful way.  I do know that something special happened in the classroom today.  If my students apply the feedback with which they were provided today, they will all certainly be able to exceed the two graded objectives for this task.  I can’t wait to read the final draft of their Learning Goals Plan on Friday as they are sure to be “legen- wait for it- dary.”

Group Writing: How to Inspire Your Students to Enjoy Writing

Sixth grade students love to talk and interact with their friends and peers.  They solve problems through talking, play games while talking, and even talk when they shouldn’t be talking.  Many sixth grade students tend to be very outgoing and interpersonal.  They experience life through social interactions, as they love doing things together in small groups or with a partner.  Teamwork and group work play vital roles for sixth grade students.  If offered the choice to work alone on a project or activity or to complete the task with a partner, most sixth grade students would choose to work with a partner.  They crave social togetherness and feeling like a part of something greater than themselves.  These connections are crucial to how successful sixth grade students feel and actually are in reality.

So, to capitalize on this important facet of sixth grade life, I wanted to try a different kind of writing activity today during Humanities class.  While many of my students have already begun to find the fun and enjoyment in writing, a few of them are still stuck in thinking that writing is a required task and not something they enjoy doing.  To help inspire my students to get into the Halloween spirit today while also helping them find the fun in the writing process, I had the boys participate in a Group Writing activity.  The students each received a different spooky story starter that was the springboard into their story.  They used this prompt to begin their story.  Each student worked on their story for five minutes, formulating a strong beginning.  They then all traded stories with a peer, read what their classmate had written, and then continued building on this new story for five minutes.  They rotated stories with their classmates three more times, as they added to new stories, building on what was already written.  The last rotation had the students finish the story that was worked on by four other students.  Throughout the process, laughter was heard on numerous occasions as they read each other’s stories and added to them.  Smiles spread across the faces of my students as they busily worked to craft scary and strange Halloween-themed stories.  The boys had a blast with the writing portion of this activity.  They all seemed so proud of their work as they pointed out some of the highlights from their pieces while they traded stories with their classmates.  One student came to me towards the end of the writing process and said, “Mr. Holt, I’m loving writing so much now that I may start doing it during my free time.  This activity is so fun.”  Another student, who struggles to write as he finds it boring, told me, “Thanks for doing this activity, Mr. Holt.  It was a lot of fun.”  The boys seemed to thoroughly enjoy crafting crazy, weird, and morbid stories together as a group.  They loved adding to what their friends had crafted and enjoyed reading what their peers had written.  While there was very little talking happening during the writing part of this activity, the social interaction component was quite high.  The students were silently interacting with their peers in written form.  I was impressed and amazed by how much my students seemed to like this activity.  It was awesome.

Before moving into the sharing portion of the activity, I asked the students for some feedback on the process.  Almost all of the students raised their hands to express how much they loved this activity.  To wrap things up, I had the students gather in the reading area of the classroom, turned off the lights, and read aloud their group write stories.  I not only had a blast reading their bizarre, scary, and often funny stories, but the students couldn’t stop laughing.  When their part of the stories was read aloud, shouts of laughter and “This is mine” were heard.  It was such a remarkable experience.  By making writing a social activity, I inspired my students to find their passion.  My students found the fun in writing during today’s activity.  While this is only one way to teach students how to write and craft stories, it is a highly successful method as it allows the students to silently engage in social discourse.  They talked with their friends through their writing.  Many of the stories had tinges of a video game the boys love playing together during their free time.  Almost every story seemed to include some reference to this game.  While I have done this activity every Halloween for the past four years, I’m amazed each and every year by how much my students truly enjoy it.  This activity is usually just the bridge many of them need to cross over the river of challenges and into the land of Writing is Fun.  I can’t wait to see what wonderful masterpieces my students put together during our next writing activity.

Varying the approach to teach writing is important in helping all students see how much fun writing can be.  While some boys love writing creative stories or historical fiction pieces, others like writing non-fiction essays or reports.  Each student is different and unique in their own way, and as teachers, it is our mission to help them tap into their potential as a writer.  What type of writing activity or genre will inspire them?  By providing the students with various writing opportunities throughout the year, we are helping them unlock the writer within.  Group writing activities like the one I did today, can help students uncover the writer inside of them.  Who knows what’s possible unless we give our students a chance to try?  So, if you’re looking to mix things up and make writing fun for your students, try a Group Writing activity.

How My Students Help Me Become a Better Teacher

When I was a young lad, I always wanted a rock polisher.  I thought they were the coolest things ever.  You can take an old, nasty looking rock and turn it into a polished stone in a matter of hours.  How awesome is that?  Every year for Christmas I asked for one, and you know what I never got?  Yes, that’s right, a rock polisher.  Now, this isn’t some rant about what I never had growing up.  This rant is all about rocks.  You see, rocks are constantly in a state of change.  The rock cycle causes them to melt, harden, shoot out of Earth, and repeat.  They also become weathered, break down, reform into something else, and then do it all over again.  Rocks are amazing like that.  Although we can never see these processes take place as they happen over long periods of time, I’ve always been in awe about how focused rocks are on changing and growing.  What I always found spectacular about rock polishers is that they can make a process that usually takes years in rivers and on Earth’s surface, to happen almost overnight.  What I love most about rocks is that they are never happy with their current state as they are always longing for improvement and change.  Liquid rock inside Earth is always trying to find a way out to become something a bit more solid and hard, while large chunks of granite rock are always looking to roll into something a bit smaller and more compact.  Rocks are fantastic role models for humans.  We can learn a lot from rocks.  Rocks teach us to value a growth mindset and persevere through problems no matter their size.  Rocks also teach us to look at the world and see the endless possibilities that exist.  Rocks are pretty phenomenal and beautiful naturally occurring objects.

Great teachers, like rocks, are always looking to grow and develop.  How can I become a more effective educator?  Reflection is definitely a huge part of that process of change, but the rest comes in the form of feedback.  Feedback we receive from our colleagues and our students.  The most effective feedback I’ve received over the years, comes from my students.  They know what they like and what they don’t like and they aren’t afraid to tell the world all about it.  Students can be brutally honest, which can be both good and bad.  However, the feedback students have provided me with over the years has allowed me to grow and mature as a teacher.  The implementation of Reader’s Workshop came out of reflecting on feedback received from my students about the books we were reading altogether as a class.  The structure of units and activities used throughout the years is all due to the wisdom I’ve gained from asking my students to comment on what they like and what they would change if they were in charge.  Reflecting on and then using feedback received from my students is why I am the effective teacher I am today.

Humanities class provided me with yet another opportunity to receive two different kinds of feedback from my students today.  As we have come to the end of our first unit on the Canaan Community, I had the students complete a survey, providing me with their thoughts on the unit as a whole.

Questions posed in the survey:

  • What was your favorite part of this unit and why?
  • What fact or piece of information, that you learned throughout the unit, did you find the most interesting or engaging?
  • What did you think about our class read-aloud Seedfolks by Paul Fleischman?
  • What did you like about the Historical Fiction Story Writing Project and why?
  • If you were the teacher teaching this unit, what would you change about it for next year?
  • Using Cardigan’s Effort Grading Scale, grade Mr. Holt on how effectively he taught this unit.

I was impressed with the honest and detailed feedback I received from the students.  Overall, they seemed to enjoy the unit.  I was a bit surprised by their favorite parts though.  While I thought for sure that almost everybody would say, “The archeological dig,” only three students cited that as their highlight of the unit.  Three other students explained how the historical fiction story writing project was their favorite part of the unit.  What?  I don’t think any student has ever cited the final project as their favorite part of the unit, which means that because I focused on helping the students find the fun and excitement in writing, they were actually able to dig into their stories more meaningfully than digging for bottles by the river.   I was happy about that.  I was also pleased that many of the students stated different facts about Canaan’s diverse history that really stuck with them, which means that I didn’t overly discuss or talk about one topic or piece of Canaan’s history too much.  Yah for me.  I also enjoyed learning that the students seem to enjoy our class read aloud novel Seedfolks.  While we don’t spend a ton of time reading and discussing this novel, I’m glad that the students enjoy it and seem to understand how it ties our unit together.  I was worried that this group of students did not like this text because they often seem so disengaged during read-alouds.

While all of the feedback I received from the boys today via this survey is useful to me, the fourth and fifth questions allowed me to extract the most meaningful feedback.  I wanted to determine what aspects of the writing process I have done an effective job explaining and introducing.  Those that I found creative and engaging ways to introduce to the students, I figured, would be their favorite part. I also wanted to know what aspects of the unit the boys did not like and want to see changed for next year.  The answers I received from the students on these two questions will help drive the revisions and changes that I make to this unit for next year.  Their feedback will also help guide me in planning future lessons this year.

Here’s what they had to say:

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It was great for me to learn that many of the students seemed to enjoy writing their historical fiction stories, which means that they found their passion; they found how to make writing fun for themselves.  If that’s all they get out of sixth grade this year, I’ll be happy.  Learning to love the act of writing will help them be successful in almost every area of school life in their future.  I also love that a few of them seemed to enjoy the choice and engagement act of the project.  They liked that I allowed them to write about whatever piece of Canaan’s history most interested them.  As research on the brain tell us, students learn best when they are engaged in the act of working and have the ability to choose the vehicle through which they showcase their learning and understanding.  It’s nice to know that at least a few of my students see the benefit in being provided choice when working.

I wasn’t very surprised by the responses my students provided regarding things they would change about the unit.  I know that in every class I have one student who doesn’t like anything, and so I wasn’t shocked to read that one student found the field experiences boring.  It wasn’t because he truly found them boring, it’s just that he doesn’t know how to utilize a growth mindset and provide meaningful feedback.  I get that.  It is nice to know that the most common response focused on time.  They want more time spent on the really fun parts of the unit.  That makes sense.  I wish we were able to allocate more time in our schedule for those fun field experiences.

Overall, the feedback from the survey will be very helpful for me to think about and reflect upon as I look at revising this unit for next year.  As the students seemed to really enjoy the historical fiction story project I used this year, I think I will stick with that as the final project for next year.  I changed it from last year because many of the students explained how they didn’t like the final poster project they needed to complete as the final project for the unit.

The second piece of feedback I received from the students today, came in the form of a rubric.  The focus for my Individualized Teacher Improvement Plan is on grading rubrics and their effectiveness for introducing and describing graded projects and activities to students, and since the students just completed the historical fiction story project using the grading rubric as a guide, I wanted to know what they thought of the grading tool.  Did the rubric help them in the writing process, and if not, what would have made the rubric more effective?  After a short whole-class discussion on that question, I had the students, working with their table partner, create a new grading rubric that I could use to assess this project next year or assess future writing projects the students complete this year.

I was so impressed with how focused the students were in working with their partner to create a new rubric.  They seemed dedicated to providing me with useful feedback.  Every group gave me some amazing insight and ideas on how to create a more student-friendly grading rubric.

My takeaways:

  • Students want me to use more simplistic, student friendly words when describing what is being asked of them to meet or exceed the objective.  For example, in the grading rubric I had the students use, I wrote, “The setting is described so well that you feel like you’re there.”  One group suggested that it should read, “You see the picture in your mind.”  I like it.  That’s some quality feedback that I can easily incorporate into the next grading rubric I create.
  • One group thinks that having visual or picture cues would help them better understand what is being expected of them at each level.  As the native language is not English for half of my class, pictures are easier to read than words.  That’s a unique idea I hadn’t thought about for a rubric before.  While they couldn’t provide any concrete examples of how I might do this, I really want to give this idea a try  for the next rubric I create.
  • One group suggested that I need to include a writing standard about not copying ideas or information from other sources in the rubric.  These two students seem to think that originality is important.  I like it, but I’m also aware that sometimes, imitation leads to inspiration and new ideas.  While I’m not sure that I will use this in a future rubric, it’s definitely something worth considering.
  • One group approached the rubric creation from a very different perspective.  Instead of starting out with what it takes to exceed the objective, they began with how not to meet the objective.  Their thought was that if I start with the lowest point value on the rubric, I can easily add more to each one as the point value increases.  They thought that would be easier than starting with the highest point value and subtracting details.  Interesting.  I never thought about this method of creating a rubric before.  Perhaps I’ll try this on a future rubric.
  • Grading rubrics seem to help the students.  Many of them found the rubric to be a valuable guidepost for them along their writing journey.  Here’s what my students had to say about them:
    • That rubric help me a lot. Because that paper tell me every moment, what did I need to improve for my story.
    • I think the grading rubric helped me in a phenomenal way because i new the objectives my story needed to meet like for example when I was trying to write my story at the beginning it helped me get a thought about what i’m supposed to do and how to get a good grade.   
    • Lastly, I have a sheet call the grading rubric, I helped me to complete the story. For example, I can see if my sentences make sense or not or see if my sentences have included everything a sentence need to have.
    • The grading rubric helped me a lot because without it I wouldn’t know what I was doing and what to change. I needed a rubric so I knew exactly what to edit.
    • I think the grading rubric helped me by providing some goals and giving me an idea of what I need to write to get a good grade.
    • I thought the grading rubric helped because it showed me what the expectations were and what exceeding the objective was. It helped me because I just focused on exceeding the objective. For example I saw that I didn’t have enough facts on the rubric so I added more in. Also I saw that I didn’t have enough details so I looked at the rubric and fixed my story.
    • The rubric helped me to put requirements in the story. For example, first I read the grading rubric. After reading it, I started to make story with requirements like five facts, correct grammar, and more.

The feedback I received from my students on the grading rubric will greatly help me as I look to create and design future rubrics.  It’s nice to know that many of my students seem to find them useful.  So, my next big data-gathering event will be when I create a project with just a simple explanation instead of using a detailed rubric.  Will this more simple project introduction better engage the students in asking questions and thinking creatively about how they will showcase their learning, or will it be too confusing for them?  I can’t wait to find out.

Because I seek feedback from my students, I’m able to grow and develop as a teacher, like a giant chunk of obsidian rock.  If I didn’t ask my students for their thoughts and ideas today, I would never really know what they thought about grading rubrics and the Canaan Community unit.  How can I collect data for my Individualized Teacher Improvement Plan if I don’t ask my students for feedback?  I can’t better support and challenge my students if they don’t challenge me by providing me with ways I can improve and grow.  As I told my class today, the best teachers make the best students as they are always looking to learn and improve.

Learning from Yesterday’s “Failures”

When I was just a wee young lad, the word “fail” was considered almost as bad as other curse words like the “F word.”  If you failed at something, it meant that you were not good and lacked talent.  No one wanted to fail or be thought of as a failure.  It was a Scarlet Letter that you wore with you for the rest of your childhood.

Now, of course, we all know that times have changed and the word failure is synonymous with success.  In order to do something well, you have to fail at it first.  We want our students to fail in order for them to learn how to grow and succeed.  While it’s amazing that our ideas on teaching have progressed so much thanks to technology and research on the neuroscience of education, I do wish that the adults in my world when I was a child would have embraced failing as an essential part of the learning process.  Had I failed more because I was inspired to take more risks with my learning, I wonder how many other things I’d be capable of doing now.  Perhaps I would have learned to stick with playing the guitar.  Maybe I’d be in a band right now, touring Europe.  That would be cool.  I’ve always wanted to see London during this time of year.

As I now see the value in failing on a regular basis because of the learning that comes from the experience, I am more willing to try new things in the classroom as a teacher.  I’m not afraid to try out a new application on the computer or a new instructional strategy in the classroom.  If it works, great; if not, it provides me with a teachable moment in the classroom.  Luckily too, I can also reflect on my failed lessons or activities and learn from them.  While I was not overly happy with the outcome of yesterday’s Humanities lesson on the process of revising writing, I had the chance to reflect on what didn’t go well yesterday.  Then today, I was able to more effectively introduce and explain the purpose of the revision process and the power that it holds.  “Revision is the most important step in the writing process because it provides you with a chance to fix what’s broken with your work.  No writer, regardless of age and experience, is able to craft the perfect piece of writing.  Every writer is in need of fixing and revising their work.  Today, you have a chance to receive feedback from as many people as possible so that you can create an even better story than what you currently have.  You also have the chance to receive such valuable feedback that you will be able to, hopefully, exceed the three graded objective for this assignment.  So, treat today’s revision period with the respect it deserves.”  After feeling as though I did not explain the process of revising one’s writing well yesterday in class, I wanted to be sure that I highlighted the benefits in revising one’s written work based on feedback from others, and I feel like I did that today.  After my introduction and review of what was to happen in class during the work period, I felt quite confident that things would be better today than they were yesterday.

My future-telling skills were clearly right on par today as the work period was phenomenal.  The boys worked so well on providing each other with feedback, revising their work, and growing as writers.  I conferenced with three students and was able to provide them some meaningful feedback that will allow them to make their story far better than it was.  While I didn’t have a chance to observe every student or group as they worked during class today as I was conferencing with students at the back table, the groups I could see and hear seemed to be bleeding greatness.  To conclude class today, I some had students share how the peer editing process went for them in class today.

“Me and my partner worked on helping each other come up with better words to describe the setting in our stories,” one student said.  I praised those two students for the great effort they put into looking at one aspect of their writing.

“My partner helped me fix grammar stuff in my story and I helped him make his story funny and not boring,” one student said, laughing.  “He even said that he’s going to write a whole new story since he doesn’t think he did a good job on his first one.”  He was describing what he and his partner worked on during their peer editing conference.  Awesome!  I then explained how amazing it was that because of feedback, this specific writer will be able to grow and develop his writing skills.

I can’t wait to read the revised stories my students will complete by early next week.  They are sure to be far better than what they had typed this week.  And to think that if I hadn’t taken the time to reflect on yesterday’s lesson and thought about how to change things for today’s class, I would not have been able to inspire my students to see the value in revising their writing while also helping their peers make their stories better.  Failure helped me better support and challenge my students to utilize a growth mindset in Humanities class today.  Making mistakes is how genuine learning is fostered.  I need to fail in order to grow.  It seems counter intuitive, but it’s how the brain works.  We are wired to remember things that are tagged with emotion, and so failed experiences stick with us because they don’t make us usually feel very good.  I thought about my “failed” class yesterday for hours, which is why I was able to spend so much time thinking about how to fix the situation in class today.  How could I help my students better appreciate the editing and revising stages of the writing process?  And wallah, I found my answer in class today.  Failure rocks!  I can’t wait to do it again.

What’s the Best Way to Help Students See the Value in Editing and Revising their Work?

As an adult, I love receiving feedback from my colleagues on how I can make my lessons more meaningful, my student comments more effective, and my blog entries more reflective.  I crave input from others as I know that I am far from perfect and am looking to grow as a teacher, thinker, and writer.   I need help from my peers to improve as an individual.  I realize this now as a grownup.  When I was a young student, things were very different for me.  I wasn’t focused on growing and developing my skills as a writer or student.  I was way more focused on having fun.  I rushed to finish every assigned task so that I could have more time to chat and interact with my friends.  I wasn’t focused on growing and making use of a growth mindset as a student, and so when a classmate or teacher provided me with feedback on how I could improve my work, I usually ignored whatever was said or quickly made a single change to the work.  I wanted to be done with my assignments when I was in school.  I operated under the assumption that when I put my pencil or pen down, my work was done.  It had to be perfect because I was finished.  No feedback given to me from anyone could make my work any better than it was in that moment.  And I certainly never went in search of feedback back then, oh no.  I was all about turning my work in and being done.  I definitely made use of a fixed mindset when I was in school.

As a teacher, I understand where my students are at.  I get it as I was once them.  They don’t want me to tell them what to do.  They don’t want me to take away their fun, play time.  They want to do the work and be done.  So, my goal is to change the atmosphere of the classroom.  I need to help my students learn to rewire their brains so that they want to learn and grow.  I need to help my students learn to accept feedback and utilize it to make their work even better.  I try to show my students the importance of using a growth mindset in the classroom.  I want my students to see the value in receiving feedback from their peers and teachers.  I want my students to want to transform into the complete opposite type of student that I was in school.  Now, I know that most middle school boys are not set ready to want to take suggestions on how to improve their work.  This is a learned skill.  I need to help them rewire their brains a bit so that they see the benefit in seeking feedback from their classmates.  This is a year-long process, but one that is near and dear to my heart.  I don’t want my students to be like me back then.  I want my students to be able to grow and develop as students and writers.

Today in Humanities class, my students worked on the self-editing, self-revising, and peer editing processes regarding their historical fiction stories as they work to create a second draft that is far better than their first, sloppy copy.  On Wednesday, I explained the difference between editing and revising and then modelled this process with a story a student of mine had written several years ago.  The boys seemed to understand that these two steps, that sometimes get lumped into one, are individual processes that need to be completed separately.  I even spent time discussing the importance of editing and revising by comparing it to a bike.  “When your bike gets a flat tire, you can’t ride it anymore.  So, what do you do?  You fix the flat tire.  That’s like the editing process.  You fix the little things.  Now, what happens to that same bike after five years of wear and tear?  It gets rusty and probably too small for you.  So, then what?  You have to make some big repairs.  That’s the revision process of writing.  You fix the big things.”  I’m not sure if this helped them better grasp the two concepts, but perhaps it did.  Those who finished their historical fiction stories in class, began the editing and revising processes.  Then, today, I went over the peer editing process by reviewing the difference between editing and revising.  I then modelled this process with a student as I explained the different parts of the worksheet that will guide this step of the writing process.  I explained this process as more of a discussion.  “Tell your partner what you specifically want feedback on so that he can hone in on that as he reads through your story.  Then, after you have both completed the worksheet and read each other’s story, have a discussion.  Talk about what your partner did well and what he needs to work on.  Be specific.”  I reminded them of their goal: To provide your partner with effective feedback so that he is able to revise and edit his story in such a way that he exceeds all of the graded objectives.  I had hoped that this explanation would be enough for my students to understand the process and be able to complete it with little to no issues.  Wow, was I ever wrong.

Two groups had meaningful discussions as they peer edited each other’s stories, talking about writing and what they need to do to make their stories more effective.  It was quite awesome to listen to these discussions as they seemed very meaningful and relevant.

“I think you need to add more detail here,” one student said.

“I sort of already do that here.  Check it out,” he responded as he pointed out what he had already typed on his laptop.  These two groups were really digging into the task of peer editing.  They seemed to really enjoy it.  Perhaps it was because they saw the value in it or maybe it was because they were trying to make their writing better so that they could exceed the objectives.  Either way, great stuff was going on in two of the groups.

Then, one student took almost the entire period to finish writing his story as he hadn’t completed it for homework like he should have.  This meant that one student was unable to have a buddy with which to peer edit.  I stepped in and provided him with feedback, but our conversation was one-sided for the most part as I had no story in need of being proofread.  The other two groups seemed to be more focused on laughing and goofing around than actually accomplishing the job of peer editing.  Despite a few reminders to stay focused and on task, they continued laughing loudly and not providing each other with useful feedback.

So, what happened with those two, ineffective groups?  Why were they unable to complete the peer editing process in the same, meaningful manner as the first two groups I mentioned?  What was the difference?  Did they not care about growing as writers?  Did they not see the value in the editing and revising processes?  Did they just want to be done with the task so that they could do anything else?  While one group was composed of two, low functioning ELLs who struggled to comprehend the task at hand, the other group did not.  So, what was their issue?  Why were they not as engaged in the process?  Did they not see the relevance in it?

As I pondered these questions for quite some time after class, I had an epiphany.  For as much as I want my students to be like the adult me and see the value in revising and editing their written work, they are sixth graders going through this process for the first time.  Developmentally, there shouldn’t be complete buy-in just yet.  They are not able to see the relevance in the important process of revision.  They need more practice before they will see how beneficial it is to them as writers.  In the meantime, I need to remember where they are at developmentally.  Their frontal lobe is not fully developed and so reasoning and critical thinking skills are lacking.  Like me back then, they won’t be able to see the power of revising and editing their work for quite some time.  This means that they also won’t see the benefit of receiving feedback on how to improve their work for a few years.  It doesn’t mean that I should stop them from completing this process.  Oh no.  It just means that I need to be more patient and flexible.  Not every sixth grader in my class is going to desire feedback on their written work like I do.  The more I can provide them with opportunities to practice giving and receiving feedback on how they can better revise and edit their written work, they more that they will able to see how important this process is to their growth as writers.  Writing is a journey, much like teaching.  And so, I need to remember that not every story or student is going to be a polished work of art at first.  It takes much time and energy to foster a sense of valuing the refining process.

In the meantime, is there anything else I could be doing that would better support those students who are struggling to see the value in the revision process?  Are there other activities or methods I could be using?  While the writing group process can work, I don’t want to utilize that activity quite yet as they won’t be able to understand the significance of providing and receiving feedback.  Tackling the task of revising and editing in small groups is a great way to allow students to test the waters to see what happens.  Tomorrow in class I will reemphasize the benefits in providing each other with meaningful feedback as they complete the peer editing process. I will review their goal and hopefully offer them one more chance to practice this difficult task.  While I’d like my students to see the value in the revision process now, I know that their brains aren’t currently ready to tackle such a complex task in a relevant manner.  As I continue to foster a sense of community in the classroom and the students grow to see each other as valuable resources, they will begin to make better use of a growth mindset when approaching the writing and revision processes.  They just need more practice and time.