Helping Students Find Enjoyment in Writing

Ever since I was in the sixth grade, I’ve loved to write.  I used to write poetry for fun when I was bored in high school.  I even used writing as an emotional outlet.  When I was struggling to accept the death of my grandfather, I wrote about it as a way of processing my feelings.  It really helped me work through a lot of challenging emotions I was facing at the time.  Writing has always been a hobby of mine.  Even now as an adult, I treasure the time it takes to blog on a daily basis, as it allows me to reflect on my teaching in a creative and meaningful manner.  Writing is my way of documenting my life and journey on Earth.  It’s how I can prove that I exist.  I also find much joy in writing.  It makes me happy when I can sit in front of my computer or at a desk with pen and paper and pour my heart, soul, and being out via words and sentences.  What seems such a simple action, provides me with such a cathartic release.  It’s free therapy.  I love it.  It’s like mental Legos.  I get to put letters and words together in new and fantastic ways so as to bleed my emotions and thoughts out.  It’s like bloodletting, without the mess and death.

As a teacher, I make it a personal goal of mine each and every year to inspire my students to find the joy in writing.  While they may not all view writing through the same rainbow-unicorn glasses I use, I want to help them find the peace and fun in writing.  I want them to write stories and poems that make them happy.  I want them to find the passion in writing.  I challenge my students to write pieces that make them want to never stop writing.  I want my students to see writing as an experience and not a task they are forced to do.  Although this is a difficult goal for me to meet on a yearly basis, it is one that I hold near and dear to my beating heart.

There are many ways to help students find enjoyment in writing.  By using the Writer’s Workshop model of writing, I help to engage the students in what they are writing.  Because they can choose what they write about, they have a far better chance of falling in love with their work than if they were pigeonholed into specific writing topics.  I also try to inspire creativity within my students by using various prompts to promote unique thoughts to be born in their minds.  Using Quick Write activities, the students use prompts as springboards into their writing.  These activities aren’t graded and rarely looked at by me.  They are word-vomit activities for the students to begin to find the fun in writing.  They begin to learn to take risks in their writing as they aren’t being graded on these short writing tasks.  While I do teach the students all about the process of writing, I try to make it fun and inviting.  I want them to see feedback as essential to the growth process.  I want them to value the thoughts and ideas provided to them by their peers and teachers.  I want them to think of writing as a never ending journey.  I tell them from the start of the year that writing pieces are never finished.  Even published authors would tell you that they would gladly revise their published books based on new ideas and feedback received.  I hopefully help my students to see writing as something they are able to do that is fun and exciting.

Today offered me the chance to provide a few students in my class with feedback that will hopefully help them better find the joy in writing.  As my students worked on their historical fiction stories, I meandered around the room like a Brook Trout searching for shade on a warm summer’s day.  I observed the students as they extracted thoughts and ideas from their brains.  I watched them play with words in order to tell a story that intrigued them.  This observation time allowed me to help two students who seemed stuck.

The first student sat at his desk in front of his laptop, tapping away on the table, not his laptop.  His body language told me that he was bored.  So, I stopped to chat with him.

“It seems as though you are stuck.  Can I offer you some help?” I said to him as he stared longingly into his computer screen.

“Yes,” he responded.

So, I read what he had typed and provided him with some feedback, “While you do a fine job explaining facts about Canaan’s history, this piece reads more like a list of things that happened than a story.  How can you transform this into a story that reads more like the books you love reading?  How can you bring life into this piece?”

He seemed a bit mystified and so I shared some examples of how I might begin a piece based on his topic.  As I didn’t want to steal too much thinking from him, I walked away at that point.  A few minutes later, I noticed that he had deleted everything he had previously written and was starting from scratch.  While he didn’t have much time to start a new story before class ended, he seemed inspired to write something that made him happy.  I can’t wait to read his sloppy copy.

Then, another student said to me, “Mr. Holt, I’m almost done my story and it’s quite long, but I’m getting bored with it.  What should I do?”

“Shall I take a look at what you’ve got and see if I can provide you with some ideas or suggestions on how to move forward?” I responded.  He seemed to like this response.  So, I sat with him and read over what he had already written.  He had crafted a unique story about the destruction of the Noyes Academy.  He approached it from an interesting angle, but he wasn’t having fun with it anymore and it showed.  I was bored just reading his piece.

“While this is a fine story and will allow you to meet the objectives covered, I can totally see why you are bored with it.  You know how the story is going to end.  You have the timeline etched onto your brain already.  There are no surprises or possibilities for fun.  I think you need to find a new story.  I think you need to start from scratch,” I told him.

He agreed with me and quickly began working on a whole new story that made him happy.  He wanted to find his passion in the writing and it wasn’t in his first piece.  While I’m glad he spoke with me about this, I wish he didn’t feel like he needed my permission to start over.  I want my students to write with joy and passion.  I tell them every time we write that they should stop and restart if they are not in love with their piece.  “If you aren’t having fun, you’re doing it wrong.”  This student saw that in himself today and then made a change.  He knew what he wanted to do, but he wanted my blessing and feedback.  When I gave it to him, he seemed relieved.  It was a pretty cool experience.

Like the two students I helped today, I hope I am able to inspire all of my students to find the joy in writing.  I want them to see writing as an experiment.  Try something new to see what happens.  If you get the result you want, great, and if not, then try again.  Don’t be afraid to fail.  Embrace the challenge of failure so that you can find the soul within your writing.  Great writing allows you to transfer your beating heart into the piece.  Great writing is alive with description, vivid details, risque topics, and remarkable settings.  I hope that my students leave the sixth grade next year able to see what fun writing can be.  I hope that I am able to help my students find enjoyment in writing this year.

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