The Power of Providing Students with Choice when Writing

“What would you like for sides with that?” wait staff at various restaurants often ask customers when they are ordering their meal.  With so many choices, it’s almost too difficult to choose; however, at the end of the day, people like being able to pick what they eat.  Some people like French fries while other people like rice or pickles.  If restaurants did not offer choices, I wonder how many customer would become repeat patrons.  Humans like to be offered options.  It empowers us and makes us feel as though we are in control.  As teachers, we need to remember this same principal when teaching our students.  Our students don’t like when we make choices for them.  They like to be able to select how and what they learn.  It engages them and allows for genuine learning to take place in the brain.

Today in my Humanities class, I made sure to provide my students with choices and options so that they would be excited and engaged in the learning process.  Following a discussion on community and what it means to be a part of a community, the students completed a Quick Write activity.  As this was our first Quick Write of the academic year, I did explain the protocol and procedure so that they understood what was expected of them.  Today’s prompt was, “Imagine the perfect community.  What would it look like?  How would it function?  Who would live there?  Where would it be located?  Explain and describe your perfect community.”  After explaining how a Quick Write works and what the prompt is asking them to do, I addressed questions the students had: “Does it have to be about a real community or can I make it up?”, “Can I write about a community I’m a part of?” and,  “Can I write it like a story?”  The boys were thrilled that they could write about any sort of community.  They were also excited that they could write it as a story or any form of writing.  They liked that they had choices for how they could complete this task.

For 15 minutes, the boys sat, quietly typing away.  Some of the students had almost a full page of text when the time had expired.  A few of the boys were upset when the time was up because they wanted to keep writing.  I love their enthusiasm and excitement.  They were all so engaged in this activity because they could choose what to write about and how to do so.  I didn’t pigeonhole them into one style or topic.  They had the freedom their brains crave.  Once the writing portion of the activity had finished, I had the students share their piece with their table partner.  They seemed to enjoy sharing their work with a peer.  I then had the students analyze their piece to determine their favorite sentence or short chunk of sentences, and a few volunteers shared what they had chosen aloud to the group.  I was so amazed with the variety of topics and genres the students utilized to accomplish this simple writing task.  To conclude the activity, I asked students to raise their hand if they had fun with this writing exercise and almost every hand in the classroom quickly shot up towards the ceiling.  That’s a great sign in my book.

My students were excited about writing, communities, and creativity today in Humanities class all because I provided them with options and choice.  Sometimes, little things make a huge difference.  I certainly could have outlined exactly what I wanted them to write about and how, but would all of my students have been as engaged with the assignment if I posed it like that?  Are all students interested in the same things?  Clearly, we know that effective teachers tap into how students learn best by providing them with options in the classroom.  Just as customers don’t like to be forced into ordering one particular side with their burger, our students don’t like to have only one way to complete an assignment.  So, let’s make sure that we find creative, engaging, and fun ways to provide our students with choices in the classroom this year.  Not only will it help our students learn better and be more excited in the classroom, it’s also a lot more fun to read different types of stories and papers than the same one written by 15 different students.  Let’s vow to make our classrooms more fun for us and our students this year.  Bring on the choices!

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