Posted in Education, Sixth Grade, Teaching

Reflections on the 2016-2017 Academic Year

It’s hard to believe that I have reached the end of yet another academic year.  How did that happen?  I made it through the late and harsh New England winter that pounded us with snow right on through to May.  I survived our numerous overnight field trips and fun activities.  I survived a new co-teacher.  And I made it through all of this with only one or two extra gray hairs sprinkled into my beard.  Where did the time go?  I know that seems like a huge cliche, but this year seemed to fly by faster than normal.  I guess they were right when they said that the good times can’t last forever.

And good times they were this year in the sixth grade.  My co-teacher and I were so lucky to have such an amazing class of fine young men.  They were kind, compassionate, creative, intelligent, curious, and hardworking students.  While it is always hard to say goodbye to a class at the end of a school, this year may be one of the most challenging as we were blessed with 14 amazing students.  But alas, we can’t purposefully fail them just so that we can keep them for another year, or can we?  They are ready to spread their wings and fly into the seventh grade.  We feel as though we have prepared them well.  They are open-minded, self aware, and creative boys who now know how to effectively coexist with their peers, think critically to solve problems encountered, and own their learning.  They are good to go.

Like the rain falling outside, I am flooded with nostalgia and great memories from the year:

  • The amazing science fair that took place in the sixth grade classroom during Parents’ Weekend in October of 2016.  The boys explained their projects and what they had learned to parents and faculty members as though they were college-level scientists.  I could not have been more proud in the moment.  The boys did such a phenomenal job showcasing their learning and the process involved in acquiring that learning.
  • Our field trips to the Sargent Center and Cape Cod.  Not only did the boys learn a lot about the natural world around us, they also learned how to be good teammates, community members, and friends.  This group of students was more closely bonded together than any other past group I’ve worked with at the sixth grade level.  They all seemed to really like each other and got along swimmingly.
  • The American Presidential Election Process unit we completed in Humanities class.  While I’ve always wanted to conduct a unit about the presidential election, I never have.  This academic year felt like the right time not just because of the circumstances of the election but also because this group seemed really curious and interested in learning more about the American political system.  The speeches they gave at the end of the unit were remarkable.  I was amazed at how brilliantly they spoke.  If the election had been between the two fictional candidates my students created, it would have been a much more mature and sophisticated election.
  • The Farm Program we implemented within our STEM class.  Every Friday, we traveled to a nearby working hobby farm so that the boys could learn about how our human world depends on the natural world for food and so much more.  The students had a blast learning all about life on a farm, raising and taking care of bunnies, crocheting, spinning wool, planting vegetables and flowers, and living a sustainable and environmentally friendly life.  This new program ended up being everything I had hoped it would be and so much more.  I hope my new co-teacher for next year continues with this beneficial component of our STEM curriculum.
  •  My third new co-teacher in three years.  Is it something I said?  Do I smell funny?  I’m hopeful that none of those reasons apply to why my co-teachers continue to leave me year after year.  I feel like I’m a great guy.  Well, this year I was fortunate enough to work with another wonderful co-teacher.  She is intelligent and creative and her brilliant ideas helped us to create more meaningful units and activities.  Her approach to the teaching of our health curriculum in the study skills class was amazing.  She had insightful discussions and conversations with the boys on relevant and important topics including drugs, sex, and relationships.  She wasn’t afraid to jump into difficult topics and conversations so that the students could be well-informed and educated on life in the crazy world in which we live.  It’s going to be hard to see her move onto teaching ninth grade history at my school next year, but I’m also excited to work with another co-teacher next year.  Who knows, maybe this one will stay with me for more than a year.

While my list could go on and on as many fine memories are forever imprinted within my long term memory, I also realize that I have much work to do to get ready for our final two days of class parties and activities.  Although reflection is good and useful in so many ways, so is sleep and family time.  So, off I go to finish the un-fun, paperwork portion of my role as a teacher.  Yuck!  I’d much rather be blogging.

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Author:

I teach sixth grade at Cardigan Mountain School in Canaan, NH. I'm currently ensconced in my fourteenth year at this small, independent boys' school. I love engaging students in relevant and hands-on learning. I was nominated for the NH Teacher of the Year Award in 2016 by a parent. While I love education and guiding students, my first passion is my family. I have a wonderful son, Jeffrey, and a beautiful and intelligent wife, Kim. I couldn't be happier. Every day is the best day of my life.

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