Posted in Boy Writers, Education, Humanities, Writer's Workshop, Writing

Why Talk About Student Writing?

In school, the only way I received feedback on my written work was when the teacher handed it back to me graded, with red marks covering the page like it had been through a serious battle with many casualties.  If I can’t redo my work, what’s the point of wasting time to correct my mistakes?  I certainly didn’t look over my mistakes and think, “Wow, I should remember this for next time.”  No, I looked at the grade and then promptly recycled the paper.  Feedback at the end of the process is futile.  My mind had already moved onto the next topic or assignment.  I didn’t care about that essay or writing assignment any longer than I needed to.  I didn’t start really growing as a writer until I was a senior in high school.  I had a teacher who utilized the Writer’s Workshop method of writing instruction.  We drafted writing pieces, revised them, peer edited them, revised them again, received feedback from the teacher, and then crafted a final draft.  That was when I realized the benefit of feedback.  If I utilized the suggestions I received from my peers and teacher, my writing became better and I improved as a writer.  I wasn’t making the changes to get a better grade, I was making the revisions to become a better writer because my teacher found a way to motivate me to want to grow as a writer.  It was awesome.

An easy way to help students receive feedback from their peers during the writing process is through something we in the sixth grade call Writer’s Groups.  The students meet in small groups of 3-4 students to share and discuss their writing.  The students take turns reading their piece aloud to the group while the other students take notes on Noticings and Wonderings.  When each student finishes reading his piece aloud to the group, the listeners share their feedback and suggestions with the author.  The writer then jots down their ideas at the end of his document or story.  The author can ask any follow-up questions he has to be sure that he knows exactly what to do to improve his piece.  The goal of Writer’s Groups is for students to share and talk about their writing to learn how they can make it more effective.  The boys in the group work together towards a common goal to help make each other better writers.  It’s an amazingly effective way to get students talking about writing as they gain some insight into how they can grow their writing piece before the final draft is due.

Today in Humanities class, we had the students participate in Writer’s Groups as a way to receive more feedback on their writing before turning in the final draft tomorrow.  After explaining the protocol, I fielded some questions from the class.  They wanted certain directions to be clarified.  “Where do I write down the feedback my group gives me?  What if I don’t like the feedback someone gives me?”  This year, my co-teacher and I made two big changes to the way we run Writer’s Groups in the sixth grade.  In the past, the author did not get to participate in the discussion of his piece, which felt restrictive.  The students felt as though they couldn’t speak for themselves or explain why they had done something a certain way.  Rather than create frustration within the students, we wanted to empower them this year.  So, the author is a part of the conversation.  He can clarify questions and speak for his piece.  It’s the writer’s job to be sure he receives as much feedback as possible on his writing piece.  The other change we made this year was in being very clear about the feedback received.  “If you don’t agree or like the feedback received, talk to the person giving you the feedback and explain yourself.  Still write down the feedback, but when revising your piece, explain why you didn’t incorporate certain pieces of advice or feedback,” I told the boys today before starting Writer’s Groups.  These two big changes had a dramatic impact on the success of the Writing Groups today.  I was so impressed and excited by the result.

As my co-teacher and I wandered around the classroom, observing the students in their groups, we heard many phenomenal conversations.  “I really like the emotion you used in describing your feelings during the climb.  It was very easy to picture how you felt.”  “At times, the story was a bit confusing when you changed from scene to scene.  Perhaps, take a look at those parts and see if you can make it easier to follow.”  “Your title was very creative and really showcased the story well.”  “You used very descriptive words to explain what was going on.”  “It was hard to picture what was going on in the story at times.  Maybe you could better describe the setting.”  Not only were they communicating effectively, using descriptive and specific language, but they were kind and compassionate in how they delivered the feedback as well.  They listened to each other’s stories intently and with a commitment to help.  They listened for areas of strength and places that were in need of improvement.  The students weren’t just going through the motions to accomplish the assigned task, they were really trying to help support their peers while also trying to be sure they received valuable feedback on how to improve their story.  I was blown away by how well the students worked together towards a common goal.  In all the years I’ve utilized this method of student feedback, today’s Writer’s Groups were the best I’ve ever observed.  I can’t wait to read the students’ final drafts tomorrow.  I’m sure they are going to be amazing because of the great and specific feedback each of the author’s received in class today.  I felt more like a fly on a wall of a cafe where talented writers were sharing their work and talking about good writing, than I did a teacher today.  Yet again, my students found a way to amaze and surprise me.  Wow!

Following class today, I pondered the outcome.  Yes, I was super stoked by the result.  My students were awesome little writers in class today.  But, what caused the result?  Why haven’t Writer’s Groups gone this well for me in the past?  Was it the two changes?  Did allowing the author to participate in the discussion help unite the groups?  Is the chemistry of the class the cause?  This group of students is kind and hard-working.  Did that make a difference?  What helped make today’s exercise go so well?  These are all great questions to keep in mind moving forward.  Will the groups be as productive next time?  Who knows?  I guess that will be the barometer by which I can determine, perhaps, what lead to today’s epic result.  For now, though, I’m just going to bask in the glory of my students.

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Author:

I teach sixth grade at Cardigan Mountain School in Canaan, NH. I'm currently ensconced in my fourteenth year at this small, independent boys' school. I love engaging students in relevant and hands-on learning. I was nominated for the NH Teacher of the Year Award in 2016 by a parent. While I love education and guiding students, my first passion is my family. I have a wonderful son, Jeffrey, and a beautiful and intelligent wife, Kim. I couldn't be happier. Every day is the best day of my life.

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