Posted in Change, Education, Humanities, Learning, Reflection, Sixth Grade, Students, Teaching, Writing

Celebrating Student Growth

After having just returned from a week-long class trip to Cape Cod, Massachusetts, I did not have high expectations for classes today.  I figured the students would be exhausted and unable to focus and concentrate.  While I did want to jump right back into the routine for the sake of the students, I also realized that they may not be as productive today in class as they have been in the past, since we had spent the last five days outside learning about the geology and ecology of the Cape Cod region.  And so, because of this, I wasn’t expecting amazing effort or quality work to be completed in class today.  I tempered my expectations or as my headmaster likes to say, “Manage your expectations.”  So, I did just that.  I went into classes today thinking that things would just be, and nothing more than that.  Well, let’s just say, I was quite surprised by what did actually happen in the sixth grade classroom today.

The students were focused and prepared to work diligently on whatever task was thrown their way.  They asked great questions to be sure they understood what was being asked of them.  They worked well independently and were able to stay on task, for the most part, when working with a peer.  I was impressed.  How was this possible?  We spent the week walking, hiking, climbing, talking, and working hard, and yet, they were still able to come to class on Saturday, of all days, and complete great work with fine effort.  Perhaps because my expectations were low, I was amazed by what did take place in class today.  Maybe I should have expected greatness as they are quite the talented group of young men.  Either way, I was tickled tan today by what I observed.

In Humanities class, my co-teacher and I had the students reflect on our trip to Cape Cod.  We generated insightful questions that allowed them to think critically about their experiences on the trip and the learning that took place.  As I had heard that some of our students already reflected on their journey during the previous class, I was sure to differentiate between the more storyboarding reflection that they had already done and the critical thinking reflection we expected them to complete in our class as I explained the activity.  Perhaps this helped motivate them to work harder and in a more focused manner.  Who knows.  All I do know is that their work and reflections were quite phenomenal.  Several of our ELL students who in the past struggled greatly with writing more than a few sentences, crafted two pages of written reflection on our trip and they still weren’t done by the end of class.  They were operating like writing and reflecting machines.  It was pretty awesome.  They cited examples from our adventure and detailed the learning that they experienced.  Maybe they are just getting better at reflecting because we do so much of it in the sixth grade.  Perhaps that’s what caused today’s outcome.  Maybe, but I still wasn’t expecting this level of work after a week away from the classroom.  It was a bit odd yet still very exciting.  Maybe, they are learning and growing like students should.  Perhaps what we saw was all part of the learning process.  Maybe they just needed a week away to allow for the synthesis of our teaching.  Perhaps our trip to Cape Cod allowed the students the opportunity to put together all of the puzzle pieces with which we have been providing them all year.  Maybe that’s what happened.  Yes, I’m sure that’s exactly what happened, he said with sarcasm dripping from his lower lip like autumn leaves falling from trees.  No matter what lead to today’s awesomeness in the classroom, I knew that it needed to be mentioned and celebrated.

So, towards the end of Humanities class, I did take the time to reflect orally on what my co-teacher and I had seen in class today.  We were impressed by how much they had written and how focused they were on the task at hand.  Many of them had accomplished more work in the short time we were together today than they had all year.  They applied the Habits of Learning we had been discussing and practicing all year in their written reflections.  They were taking ownership of their learning, and learning from mistakes made.  Wow!  It was phenomenal.  As I shared my reflection on today’s work period, smiles swayed through the classroom like the wave at a sporting event.  Hopefully, the boys understood how proud we are of them and their progress this year in the sixth grade.  It’s important to celebrate victories of any size so that our students can truly reflect upon their learning and growth.

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Author:

I teach sixth grade at Cardigan Mountain School in Canaan, NH. I'm currently ensconced in my fourteenth year at this small, independent boys' school. I love engaging students in relevant and hands-on learning. I was nominated for the NH Teacher of the Year Award in 2016 by a parent. While I love education and guiding students, my first passion is my family. I have a wonderful son, Jeffrey, and a beautiful and intelligent wife, Kim. I couldn't be happier. Every day is the best day of my life.

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